2015/04/30

安倍総理 アメリカ議会演説



安倍首相が,日本の総理大臣としては初めて,アメリカ連邦議会上下両院合同会議で演説を行いました。

戦後70年の節目の年に,日頃から「アメリカに押し付けられた日本国憲法を一刻も早く改正すべき」とする安倍首相は,何を語ったのか。英日対訳形式で書き留めておきます。

最後まで読んでいただける人のために,問題を一つ用意しました。答えは最後に記しました。
 
問) 安倍首相がエイブと呼ばれても「悪い気がしない」と言っているのはなぜですか。
 

はじめに
 
Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, distinguished members of the Senate and the House, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen,
議長、副大統領、上院議員、下院議員の皆様、ゲストと、すべての皆様、

Back in June, 1957, Nobusuke Kishi, my grandfather, standing right here, as Prime Minister of Japan, began his address, by saying, and I quote,
1957年6月、日本の総理大臣としてこの演台に立った私の祖父、岸信介は、次のように述べて演説を始めました。
 
“It is because of our strong belief in democratic principles and ideals that Japan associates herself with the free nations of the world.”
「日本が、世界の自由主義国と提携しているのも、民主主義の原則と理想を確信しているからであります」。

58 years have passed. Today, I am honored to stand here as the first Japanese Prime Minister ever to address your joint meeting.  I extend my heartfelt gratitude to you for inviting me.
以来58年、このたびは上下両院合同会議に日本国総理として初めてお話する機会を与えられましたことを、光栄に存じます。お招きに、感謝申し上げます。

I have lots of things to tell you.  But I am here with no ability, nor the intention, ... to filibuster.
申し上げたいことはたくさんあります。でも、「フィリバスター」をする意図、能力ともに、ありません。
 
As I stand in front of you today, the names of your distinguished colleagues that Japan welcomed as your ambassadors come back to me:
皆様を前にして胸中を去来しますのは、日本が大使としてお迎えした偉大な議会人のお名前です。
 
the honorable Mike Mansfield, Walter Mondale, Tom Foley, and Howard Baker.
マイク・マンスフィールド、ウォルター・モンデール、トム・フォーリー、そしてハワード・ベイカー。
 
On behalf of the Japanese people, thank you so very very much for sending us such shining champions of democracy.
民主主義の輝くチャンピオンを大使として送って下さいましたことを、日本国民を代表して、感謝申し上げます。

Ambassador Caroline Kennedy also embodies the tradition of American democracy.
キャロライン・ケネディ大使も、米国民主主義の伝統を体現する方です。

Thank you so much, Ambassador Kennedy, for all the dynamic work you have done for all of us.
大使の活躍に、感謝申し上げます。

We all miss Senator Daniel Inouye, who symbolized the honor and achievements of Japanese-Americans.
私ども、残念に思いますのは、ダニエル・イノウエ上院議員がこの場においでにならないことです。日系アメリカ人の栄誉とその達成を、一身に象徴された方でした。
 
 
アメリカと私
 
Ladies and gentlemen, my first encounter with America goes back to my days as a student, when I spent a spell in California.
私個人とアメリカとの出会いは、カリフォルニアで過ごした学生時代にさかのぼります。

A lady named Catherine Del Francia let me live in her house.  She was a widow, and always spoke of her late husband saying,
家に住まわせてくれたのは、キャサリン・デル-フランシア夫人。寡婦でした。亡くした夫のことを、いつもこう言いました、
 
“You know, he was much more handsome than Gary Cooper.”  She meant it.  She really did.
「ゲイリー・クーパーより男前だったのよ」と。心から信じていたようです。
 
In the gallery, you see, my wife, Akie, is there.  I don't dare ask what she says about me. 
ギャラリーに、私の妻、昭恵がいます。彼女が日頃、私のことをどう言っているのかはあえて聞かないことにします。
 
Mrs. Del Francia’s Italian cooking was simply out of this world.  She was cheerful, and so kind, as to let lots and lots of people stop by at her house. 
デル-フランシア夫人のイタリア料理は、世界一。彼女の明るさと親切は、たくさんの人をひきつけました。
 
They were so diverse.  I was amazed and said to myself, "America is an awesome country."
その人たちがなんと多様なこと。「アメリカは、すごい国だ」。驚いたものです。

Later, I took a job at a steelmaker, and I was given the chance to work in New York.
のち、鉄鋼メーカーに就職した私は、ニューヨーク勤務の機会を与えられました。

Here in the U.S. rank and hierarchy are neither here nor there. People advance based on merit.  When you discuss things you don’t pay much attention to who is junior or senior.  You just choose the best idea, no matter who the idea was from.
上下関係にとらわれない実力主義。地位や長幼の差に関わりなく意見を戦わせ、正しい見方なら躊躇なく採用する。
 
This culture intoxicated me. So much so, after I got elected as a member of the House, some of the old guard in my party would say, "hey, you’re so cheeky, Abe."
この文化に毒されたのか、やがて政治家になったら、先輩大物議員たちに、アベは生意気だと随分言われました。
 
 
アメリカ民主主義と日本
 
As for my family name, it is not “Eighb.”  Some Americans do call me that every now and then, but I don’t take offense.
私の苗字ですが、「エイブ」ではありません。アメリカの方に時たまそう呼ばれると、悪い気はしません。

That's because, ladies and gentlemen, the Japanese, ever since they started modernization, have seen the very foundation for democracy in that famous line in the Gettysburg Address.
民主政治の基礎を、日本人は、近代化を始めてこのかた、ゲティスバーグ演説の有名な一節に求めてきたからです。

The son of a farmer-carpenter can become the President... The fact that such a country existed woke up the Japanese of the late 19th century to democracy.
農民大工の息子が大統領になれる―、そういう国があることは、19世紀後半の日本を、民主主義に開眼させました。

For Japan, our encounter with America was also our encounter with democracy.  And that was more than 150 years ago, giving us a mature history together.
日本にとって、アメリカとの出会いとは、すなわち民主主義との遭遇でした。出会いは150年以上前にさかのぼり、年季を経ています。
 
 
第二次大戦メモリアル 
 
Before coming over here, I was at the World War II Memorial.  It was a place of peace and calm that struck me as a sanctuary.  The air was filled with the sound of water breaking in the fountains.
先刻私は、第二次大戦メモリアルを訪れました。神殿を思わせる、静謐な場所でした。耳朶を打つのは、噴水の、水の砕ける音ばかり。
 
In one corner stands the Freedom Wall. More than 4,000 gold stars shine on the wall.  I gasped with surprise to hear that each star represents the lives of 100 fallen soldiers.
一角にフリーダム・ウォールというものがあって、壁面には金色の、4000個を超す星が埋め込まれている。その星一つ、ひとつが、斃れた兵士100人分の命を表すと聞いたとき、私を戦慄が襲いました。
 
I believe those gold stars are a proud symbol of the sacrifices in defending freedom.  But in those gold stars, we also find the pain, sorrow, and love for family of young Americans who otherwise would have lived happy lives.
金色(こんじき)の星は、自由を守った代償として、誇りのシンボルに違いありません。しかしそこには、さもなければ幸福な人生を送っただろうアメリカの若者の、痛み、悲しみが宿っている。 家族への愛も。
 
Pearl Harbor, Bataan Corregidor, Coral Sea.... The battles engraved at the Memorial crossed my mind, and I reflected upon the lost dreams and lost futures of those young Americans.
真珠湾、バターン・コレヒドール、珊瑚海…、メモリアルに刻まれた戦場の名が心をよぎり、私はアメリカの若者の、失われた夢、未来を思いました。
 
History is harsh. What is done cannot be undone.  With deep repentance in my heart, I stood there in silent prayers for some time.
歴史とは実に取り返しのつかない、苛烈なものです。私は深い悔悟を胸に、しばしその場に立って、黙祷を捧げました。
 
My dear friends, on behalf of Japan and the Japanese people, I offer with profound respect my eternal condolences to the souls of all American people that were lost during World War II.
親愛なる、友人の皆さん、日本国と、日本国民を代表し、先の戦争に斃れた米国の人々の魂に、深い一礼を捧げます。とこしえの、哀悼を捧げます。
 
 
かつての敵、今日の友 
 
Ladies and gentlemen, in the gallery today is Lt. Gen. Lawrence Snowden.  Seventy years ago in February, he landed on Iōtō, or the island of Iwo Jima, as a captain in command of a company.
みなさま、いまギャラリーに、ローレンス・スノーデン海兵隊中将がお座りです。70年前の2月、23歳の海兵隊大尉として中隊を率い、硫黄島に上陸した方です。
 
In recent years, General Snowden has often participated in the memorial services held jointly by Japan and the U.S. on Iōtō. He said, and I quote,
近年、中将は、硫黄島で開く日米合同の慰霊祭にしばしば参加してこられました。 こう、仰っています。
 
“We didn’t and don’t go to Iwo Jima to celebrate victory, but for the purpose to pay tribute to and honor those who lost their lives on both sides.”
「硫黄島には、勝利を祝うため行ったのではない、行っているのでもない。その厳かなる目的は、双方の戦死者を追悼し、栄誉を称えることだ」。
 
Next to General. Snowden sits Diet Member Yoshitaka Shindo, who is a former member of my Cabinet.  His grandfather, General Tadamichi Kuribayashi, whose valor we remember even today, was the commander of the Japanese garrison during the Battle of Iwo Jima.
もうおひとかた、中将の隣にいるのは、新藤義孝国会議員。かつて私の内閣で閣僚を務めた方ですが、この方のお祖父さんこそ、勇猛がいまに伝わる栗林忠道大将・硫黄島守備隊司令官でした。
 
What should we call this, if not a miracle of history?
これを歴史の奇跡と呼ばずして、何をそう呼ぶべきでしょう。
 
Enemies that had fought each other so fiercely have become friends bonded in spirit.  To General Snowden, I say that I pay tribute to your efforts for reconciliation. Thank you so very much.
熾烈に戦い合った敵は、心の紐帯が結ぶ友になりました。スノーデン中将、和解の努力を尊く思います。ほんとうに、ありがとうございました。
 
 
アメリカと戦後日本 
 
Post war, we started out on our path bearing in mind feelings of deep remorse over the war.  Our actions brought suffering to the peoples in Asian countries. We must not avert our eyes from that.
戦後の日本は、先の大戦に対する痛切な反省を胸に、歩みを刻みました。自らの行いが、アジア諸国民に苦しみを与えた事実から目をそむけてはならない。
 
I will uphold the views expressed by the previous prime ministers in this regard.
これらの点についての思いは、歴代総理と全く変わるものではありません。
 
We must all the more contribute in every respect to the development of Asia.  We must spare no effort in working for the peace and prosperity of the region.  Reminding ourselves of all that, we have come all this way.  I am proud of this path we have taken.
アジアの発展にどこまでも寄与し、地域の平和と、繁栄のため、力を惜しんではならない。自らに言い聞かせ、歩んできました。この歩みを、私は、誇りに思います。
 
70 years ago, Japan had been reduced to ashes.  Then came each and every month from the citizens of the United States gifts to Japan like milk for our children and warm sweaters, and even goats. Yes, from America, 2,036 goats came to Japan.
焦土と化した日本に、子ども達の飲むミルク、身につけるセーターが、毎月毎月、米国の市民から届きました。山羊も、2,036頭、やってきました。
 
And it was Japan that received the biggest benefit from the very beginning by the post-war economic system that the U.S. had fostered by opening up its own market and calling for a liberal world economy.
米国が自らの市場を開け放ち、世界経済に自由を求めて育てた戦後経済システムによって、最も早くから、最大の便益を得たのは、日本です。
 
Later on, from the 1980’s, we saw the rise of the Republic of Korea, Taiwan, the ASEAN countries, and before long, China as well.  This time, Japan too devotedly poured in capital and technologies to support their growths.
下って1980年代以降、韓国が、台湾が、ASEAN諸国が、やがて中国が勃興します。今度は日本も、資本と、技術を献身的に注ぎ、彼らの成長を支えました。
 
Meanwhile in the U.S., Japan created more employment than any other foreign nation but one, coming second only to the U.K.
一方米国で、日本は外国勢として2位、英国に次ぐ数の雇用を作り出しました。
 
 
TPP
 
In this way, prosperity was fostered first by the U.S., and second by Japan.   And prosperity is nothing less than the seedbed for peace.
こうして米国が、次いで日本が育てたものは、繁栄です。そして繁栄こそは、平和の苗床です。
 
Involving countries in Asia-Pacific whose backgrounds vary, the U.S. and Japan must take the lead.  We must take the lead to build a market that is fair, dynamic, sustainable, and is also free from the arbitrary intentions of any nation.
日本と米国がリードし、生い立ちの異なるアジア太平洋諸国に、いかなる国の恣意的な思惑にも左右されない、フェアで、ダイナミックで、持続可能な市場をつくりあげなければなりません。
 
In the Pacific market, we cannot overlook sweat shops or burdens on the environment.  Nor can we simply allow free riders on intellectual property.
太平洋の市場では、知的財産がフリーライドされてはなりません。過酷な労働や、環境への負荷も見逃すわけにはいかない。
 
No. Instead, we can spread our shared values around the world and have them take root: the rule of law, democracy, and freedom.
許さずしてこそ、自由、民主主義、法の支配、私たちが奉じる共通の価値を、世界に広め、根づかせていくことができます。
 
That is exactly what the TPP is all about.
その営為こそが、TPPにほかなりません。
 
Furthermore, the TPP goes far beyond just economic benefits. It is also about our security. Long-term, its strategic value is awesome. We should never forget that.
しかもTPPには、単なる経済的利益を超えた、長期的な、安全保障上の大きな意義があることを、忘れてはなりません。
 
The TPP covers an area that accounts for 40 per cent of the world economy, and one third of global trade. We must turn the area into a region for lasting peace and prosperity.  That is for the sake of our children and our children's children.
経済規模で、世界の4割、貿易量で、世界の3分の1を占める一円に、私達の子や、孫のために、永続的な「平和と繁栄の地域」をつくりあげていかなければなりません。
 
As for U.S. - Japan negotiations, the goal is near.  Let us bring the TPP to a successful conclusion through our joint leadership. 
日米間の交渉は、出口がすぐそこに見えています。米国と、日本のリーダーシップで、TPPを一緒に成し遂げましょう。
 
 
強い日本へ、改革あるのみ
 
As a matter of fact, I have something I can tell you now.
実は…、いまだから言えることがあります。
 
It was about 20 years ago.  The GATT negotiations for agriculture were going on.  I was much younger, and like a ball of fire, and opposed to opening Japan's agricultural market.  I even joined farmers' representatives in a rally in front of the Parliament.
20年以上前、GATT農業分野交渉の頃です。血気盛んな若手議員だった私は、農業の開放に反対の立場をとり、農家の代表と一緒に、国会前で抗議活動をしました。
 
However, Japan’s agriculture has gone into decline over these last 20 years. The average age of our farmers has gone up by 10 years and is now more than 66 years old.
ところがこの20年、日本の農業は衰えました。農民の平均年齢は10歳上がり、いまや66歳を超えました。
 
Japan's agriculture is at a crossroads.  In order for it to survive, it has to change now.
日本の農業は、岐路にある。生き残るには、いま、変わらなければなりません。

We are bringing great reforms toward the agriculture policy that's been in place for decades.  We are also bringing sweeping reforms to our agricultural cooperatives that have not changed in 60 long years.
私たちは、長年続いた農業政策の大改革に立ち向かっています。60年も変わらずにきた農業協同組合の仕組みを、抜本的に改めます。
 
Corporate governance in Japan is now fully in line with global standards, because we made it stronger.  Rock-solid regulations are being broken in such sectors as medicine and energy. And I am the spearhead.
世界標準に則って、コーポレート・ガバナンスを強めました。医療・エネルギーなどの分野で、岩盤のように固い規制を、私自身が槍の穂先となりこじあけてきました。
 
To turn around our depopulation, I am determined to do whatever it takes.  We are changing some of our old habits to empower women so they can get more actively engaged in all walks of life.
人口減少を反転させるには、何でもやるつもりです。女性に力をつけ、もっと活躍してもらうため、古くからの慣習を改めようとしています。
 
In short, Japan is right in the middle of a quantum leap.
日本はいま、「クォンタム・リープ(量子的飛躍)」のさなかにあります。
 
My dear members of the Congress, please do come and see the new Japan, where we have regained our spirit of reform and our sense of speed.
親愛なる、上院、下院議員の皆様、どうぞ、日本へ来て、改革の精神と速度を取り戻した新しい日本を見てください。
 
Japan will not run away from any reforms.  We keep our eyes only on the road ahead and push forward with structural reforms.  That's TINA: There Is No Alternative.  And there is no doubt about it whatsoever.
日本は、どんな改革からも逃げません。ただ前だけを見て構造改革を進める。この道のほか、道なし。確信しています。
 
 
戦後世界の平和と、日本の選択
 
My dear colleagues, the peace and security of the post-war world was not possible without American leadership.
親愛なる、同僚の皆様、戦後世界の平和と安全は、アメリカのリーダーシップなくして、ありえませんでした。
 
Looking back, it makes me happy all the time that Japan of years past made the right decision.  As I told you at the outset, citing my grandfather, that decision was to choose a path.
省みて私が心から良かったと思うのは、かつての日本が、明確な道を選んだことです。その道こそは、冒頭、祖父の言葉にあったとおり、米国と組み、西側世界の一員となる選択にほかなりませんでした。
 
That's the path for Japan to ally itself with the U.S., and to go forward as a member of the Western world. In the end, together with the U.S. and other like-minded democracies, we won the Cold War.
日本は、米国、そして志を共にする民主主義諸国とともに、最後には冷戦に勝利しました。
 
That's the path that made Japan grow and prosper. And even today, there is no alternative.
この道が、日本を成長させ、繁栄させました。そして今も、この道しかありません。
 
 
地域における同盟のミッション 
 
My dear colleagues, we support the “rebalancing” by the U.S. in order to enhance the peace and security of the Asia-Pacific region. And I will state clearly.  We will support the U.S. effort first, last, and throughout.
私たちは、アジア太平洋地域の平和と安全のため、米国の「リバランス」を支持します。徹頭徹尾支持するということを、ここに明言します。
 
Japan has deepened its strategic relations with Australia and India.  We are enhancing our cooperation across many fields with the countries of ASEAN and the Republic of Korea.
日本は豪州、インドと、戦略的な関係を深めました。ASEANの国々や韓国と、多面にわたる協力を深めていきます。
 
Adding those partners to the central pillar that is the U.S.-Japan alliance, our region will get stable remarkably more.
日米同盟を基軸とし、これらの仲間が加わると、私たちの地域は格段に安定します。
 
Now, Japan will provide up to 2.8 billion dollars in assistance to help improve U.S. bases in Guam, which will gain strategic significance even more in the future.
日本は、将来における戦略的拠点の一つとして期待されるグアム基地整備事業に、28億ドルまで資金協力を実施します。
 
As regards the state of Asian waters, let me underscore here my three principles.
アジアの海について、私がいう3つの原則をここで強調させてください。
 
First, states shall make their claims based on international law.
第一に、国家が何か主張をするときは、国際法にもとづいてなすこと。
 
Second, they shall not use force or coercion to drive their claims.
第二に、武力や威嚇は、自己の主張のため用いないこと。
 
And third, to settle disputes, any disputes, they shall do so by peaceful means.
そして第三に、紛争の解決は、あくまで平和的手段によること。

We must make the vast seas stretching from the Pacific to the Indian Oceans seas of peace and freedom, where all follow the rule of law.
太平洋から、インド洋にかけての広い海を、自由で、法の支配が貫徹する平和の海にしなければなりません。
 
For that very reason we must fortify the U.S.-Japan alliance.  That is our responsibility.
そのためにこそ、日米同盟を強くしなくてはなりません。私達には、その責任があります。

Now, let me tell you. In Japan we are working hard to enhance the legislative foundations for our security.  Once in place, Japan will be much more able to provide a seamless response for all levels of crisis.
日本はいま、安保法制の充実に取り組んでいます。実現のあかつき、日本は、危機の程度に応じ、切れ目のない対応が、はるかによくできるようになります。

These enhanced legislative foundations should make the cooperation between the U.S. military and Japan's Self Defense Forces even stronger, and the alliance still more solid, providing credible deterrence for the peace in the region.
この法整備によって、自衛隊と米軍の協力関係は強化され、日米同盟は、より一層堅固になります。それは地域の平和のため、確かな抑止力をもたらすでしょう。

This reform is the first of its kind and a sweeping one in our post-war history.  We will achieve this by this coming summer.
戦後、初めての大改革です。この夏までに、成就させます。
 
Now, I have something to share with you.  The day before yesterday Secretaries Kerry and Carter met our Foreign Minister Kishida and Defense Minister Nakatani for consultations.
ここで皆様にご報告したいことがあります。一昨日、ケリー国務長官、カーター国防長官は、私たちの岸田外相、中谷防衛相と会って、協議をしました。
 
As a result, we now have a new framework. A framework to better put together the forces of the U.S. and Japan.  A framework that is in line with the legislative attempts going on in Japan.
いま申し上げた法整備を前提として、日米がそのもてる力をよく合わせられるようにする仕組みができました。一層確実な平和を築くのに必要な枠組みです。
 
That is what's necessary to build peace, more reliable peace in the region. And that is namely the new Defense Cooperation Guidelines.  Yesterday, President Obama and I fully agreed on the significance of these Guidelines.
それこそが、日米防衛協力の新しいガイドラインにほかなりません。昨日、オバマ大統領と私は、その意義について、互いに認め合いました。
 
Ladies and gentlemen, we agreed on a document that is historic.
皆様、私たちは、真に歴史的な文書に、合意をしたのです。
 
 
日本が掲げる新しい旗 
 
In the early 1990s, in the Persian Gulf Japan's Self-Defense Forces swept away sea mines.  For 10 years in the Indian Ocean, Japanese Self-Defense Forces supported your operation to stop the flow of terrorists and arms.
1990年代初め、日本の自衛隊は、ペルシャ湾で機雷の掃海に当たりました。後、インド洋では、テロリストや武器の流れを断つ洋上作戦を、10年にわたって支援しました。
 
Meanwhile in Cambodia, the Golan Heights, Iraq, Haiti, and South Sudan, members of our Self-Defense Forces provided humanitarian support and peace keeping operations. Their number amounts to 50,000.
その間、5万人にのぼる自衛隊員が、人道支援や平和維持活動に従事しました。カンボジア、ゴラン高原、イラク、ハイチや南スーダンといった国や、地域においてです。
 
Based on this track record, we are resolved to take yet more responsibility for the peace and stability in the world.  It is for that purpose we are determined to enact all necessary bills by this coming summer. And we will do exactly that.
これら実績をもとに、日本は、世界の平和と安定のため、これまで以上に責任を果たしていく。そう決意しています。そのために必要な法案の成立を、この夏までに、必ず実現します。
 
We must make sure human security will be preserved in addition to national security. That's our belief, firm and solid.
国家安全保障に加え、人間の安全保障を確かにしなくてはならないというのが、日本の不動の信念です。
 
We must do our best so that every individual gets education, medical support, and an opportunity to rise to be self-reliant.
人間一人ひとりに、教育の機会を保障し、医療を提供し、自立する機会を与えなければなりません。

Armed conflicts have always made women suffer the most.  In our age, we must realize the kind of world where finally women are free from human rights abuses.
紛争下、常に傷ついたのは、女性でした。わたしたちの時代にこそ、女性の人権が侵されない世の中を実現しなくてはいけません。
 
Our servicemen and women have made substantial accomplishments. So have our aid workers who have worked so steadily. Their combined sum has given us a new self-identity.
自衛隊員が積み重ねてきた実績と、援助関係者たちがたゆまず続けた努力と、その両方の蓄積は、いまやわたしたちに、新しい自己像を与えてくれました。
 
That's why we now hold up high a new banner that is "proactive contribution to peace based on the principle of international cooperation."
いまや私たちが掲げるバナーは、「国際協調主義にもとづく、積極的平和主義」という旗です。

Let me repeat. "Proactive contribution to peace based on the principle of international cooperation" should lead Japan along its road for the future.
繰り返しましょう、「国際協調主義にもとづく、積極的平和主義」こそは、日本の将来を導く旗印となります。
 
Problems we face include terrorism, infectious diseases, natural disasters and climate change.  The time has come for the U.S.-Japan alliance to face up to and jointly tackle those challenges that are new.
テロリズム、感染症、自然災害や、気候変動――。日米同盟は、これら新たな問題に対し、ともに立ち向かう時代を迎えました。

After all our alliance has lasted more than a quarter of the entire history of the United States. It is an alliance that is sturdy, bound in trust and friendship, deep between us.
日米同盟は、米国史全体の、4分の1以上に及ぶ期間続いた堅牢さを備え、深い信頼と、友情に結ばれた同盟です。

No new concept should ever be necessary for the alliance that connects us, the biggest and the second biggest democratic powers in the free world, in working together.
自由世界第一、第二の民主主義大国を結ぶ同盟に、この先とも、新たな理由付けは全く無用です。

Always, it is an alliance that cherishes our shared values of the rule of law, respect for human rights and freedom.
それは常に、法の支配、人権、そして自由を尊ぶ、価値観を共にする結びつきです。
 
 
未来への希望 
 
When I was young in high school and listened to the radio, there was a song that flew out and shook my heart. It was a song by Carol King.
まだ高校生だったとき、ラジオから流れてきたキャロル・キングの曲に、私は心を揺さぶられました。
 
“When you're down and troubled, ...close your eyes and think of me, and I'll be there to brighten up even your darkest night.”
「落ち込んだ時、困った時、...目を閉じて、私を思って。私は行く。あなたのもとに。たとえそれが、あなたにとっていちばん暗い、そんな夜でも、明るくするために」。

And that day, March 11, 2011, a big quake, a tsunami, and a nuclear accident hit the northeastern part of Japan. The darkest night fell upon Japan.
2011年3月11日、日本に、いちばん暗い夜がきました。日本の東北地方を、地震と津波、原発の事故が襲ったのです。

But it was then we saw the U.S. armed forces rushing to Japan to the rescue at a scale never seen or heard before.  Lots and lots of people from all corners of the U.S. extended the hand of assistance to the children in the disaster areas.
そして、そのときでした。米軍は、未曾有の規模で救難作戦を展開してくれました。本当にたくさんの米国人の皆さんが、東北の子供たちに、支援の手を差し伸べてくれました。

Yes, we've got a friend in you.
私たちには、トモダチがいました。

Together with the victims you shed tears. You gave us something, something very, very precious.
被災した人々と、一緒に涙を流してくれた。そしてなにものにもかえられない、大切なものを与えてくれた。

That was hope, hope for the future.
―希望、です。

Ladies and gentlemen, the finest asset the U.S. has to give to the world was hope, is hope, will be, and must always be hope.
米国が世界に与える最良の資産、それは、昔も、今も、将来も、希望であった、希望である、希望でなくてはなりません。

Distinguished representatives of the citizens of the United States, let us call the U.S.-Japan alliance, an alliance of hope.  Let the two of us, America and Japan, join our hands together and do our best to make the world a better, a much better, place to live.
米国国民を代表する皆様。私たちの同盟を、「希望の同盟」と呼びましょう。アメリカと日本、力を合わせ、世界をもっとはるかに良い場所にしていこうではありませんか。

Alliance of Hope.... Together, we can make a difference.
希望の同盟―。 一緒でなら、きっとできます。
 
Thank you so much.
ありがとうございました。



問)安倍首相がエイブと呼ばれても「悪い気がしない」と言っているのはなぜですか。

答)「私の苗字ですが、「エイブ」ではありません。アメリカの方に時たまそう呼ばれると、悪い気はしません。民主政治の基礎を、日本人は、近代化を始めてこのかた、ゲティスバーグ演説の有名な一節に求めてきたからです。」とあります。

Abe がエイブと読まれてしまうのは,英語には,【母音字+子音字+e】のとき,ストレスのある母音字はアルファベット読みをするというパターンがあるためです。
 
ゲティスバーグ演説は,1863年,南北戦争の最大の激戦地であったゲッティスバーグで行われた演説で,その有名な一節とは,すなわち,この演説の最後を飾る一節,
 
...and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.(そして、人民の人民による人民のための政治を地上から決して消滅させないために ...) ですね。
 
そして,この演説をした人は,アメリカ第16代大統領 ○○○ラハム・リンカーン,そして彼の愛称が,そう,abe (エイブ)だったのですね。

リンカーン同様に,オバマ大統領も,弁護士でイリノイ州選出の議員。オバマ大統領が最も尊敬する人でもあったわけです。


注)
1. filibuster 【フィリバスター】とは,長い演説などをして議事の進行を妨害する行為のこと。 日本でもかつて“牛歩戦術”のような,子どもに説明がつかないような恥ずかしい行為が行われていました。
 
2. 故ダニエル・イノウエ上院議員は,ハワイ生まれの日系2世。第2次世界大戦では,アメリカ陸軍に従軍。元陸軍大尉。 50年以上にわたり民主党上院議員を務めていました。(1924‐2012)

3. 「日本はいま、クォンタム・リープ(量子的飛躍)のさなかにあります。」のクォンタム・リープとは,唐突過ぎて違和感がありますが,量子力学用語で,元ソニーCEOの出井氏が2006年に立ちあげたベンチャー企業の社名でもあります。 果たして聞いている議員の方たちには,この言葉が理解してもらえたのでしょうか。

なお,社名のいきさつについて出井氏は次のように述べています。「事業や技術の成長というのは,右肩上がりの直線のように連続的に伸びていくわけではなく,突然、飛躍的にジャンプすることがある。これは私自身がソニー時代に何度も経験したことです。スポーツの場合でも,練習を重ねていると突然上手くなる瞬間があります。そして,いま日本という国にもこの“非連続の飛躍”が必要という意味で「クオンタムリープ」という社名をつけました。」(参考:ベンチャー通信ONLINE http://v-tsushin.jp/

4. 安倍首相が「徹頭徹尾支持する」と明言した,アメリカの「リバランス」とは,中国の台頭に伴って、これまでのアメリカの世界戦略を見直して、その重心をアジア・太平洋を地域に移そうとする軍事・外交政策のことです。

5. 「日本は、将来における戦略的拠点の一つとして期待されるグアム基地整備事業に、28億ドルまで資金協力を実施します。」 28億ドルは日本円にすると約3,000億円です。
 
5. 安倍首相が高校生の時に心揺さぶられたという,Carol king の曲は  こちら です。この文脈で使われると,この曲を大切に思っている人にとっては気分の良いものではありません。

6. 演説の最後にある"Alliance of Hope" は、常識的には、オバマ大統領がまだ無名の2004年民主党大会でイリノイ州の代表として行った基調演説 『The Audacity of Hope』 を想起させる言葉です。この演説は今でも語り継がれるほどの歴史に残る大演説でした。安倍首相自身は知らされていなかったのですね。無邪気にもひたすら原稿を見ながら, 「米国国民を代表する皆様。私たちの同盟を「Alliance of Hope」と呼びましょう。」って言われても,聞いている議員の方たちは,どのように感じたのでしょうか。



特に,看過できない箇所。

日本はいま、安保法制の充実に取り組んでいます。実現のあかつき、日本は、危機の程度に応じ、切れ目のない対応が、はるかによくできるようになります。

この法整備によって、自衛隊と米軍の協力関係は強化され、日米同盟は、より一層堅固になります。それは地域の平和のため、確かな抑止力をもたらすでしょう。

戦後、初めての大改革です。この夏までに、成就させます。

ここで皆様にご報告したいことがあります。一昨日、ケリー国務長官、カーター国防長官は、私たちの岸田外相、中谷防衛相と会って、協議をしました。

いま申し上げた法整備を前提として、日米がそのもてる力をよく合わせられるようにする仕組みができました。

一層確実な平和を築くのに必要な枠組みです。それこそが、日米防衛協力の新しいガイドラインにほかなりません。

昨日、オバマ大統領と私は、その意義について、互いに認め合いました。皆様、私たちは、真に歴史的な文書に、合意をしたのです。


以上の箇所です。

まだ,日本の唯一の立法機関である国会に,なんら法案も提出されていない段階で,他国の議会でこんなことを平気で言ってしまうなんて,ありえないことです。あまりに日本国民を馬鹿にしていると思いました。

手続きを踏まないで,国会で決める前に,勝手に他国に約束してくるなんて。日本の民主主義なんてこんなものかと全世界に発信しているようなものです。アメリカ議会に対しても実に非礼なことだと思います。

民主主義にとっての手続きは,民主主義は手続きそのもの,と言ってもいいぐらい大事なものなのです。まったく看過できない,民主主義的論理矛盾に満ちた支離滅裂な文章だと言えます。

安倍総理とスピーチライターの某内閣官房参与(慶応義塾大学大学院教授),これが大のおとなが2人も揃って作る文章ですか?!

さらに見過ごせないと感じたのが,事前に原稿を見ていたはずの内閣の他の参与の人たち。なんで何も言わなかったのですか?言えない雰囲気だったの?言ったら怒られちゃうから?

こういうのってとても危険です。総理の周りにはその場の空気を読んで行動する官僚しかいないのですか。安倍総理を裸の王様にしてはいけません。

日本外交,こんなんでいいのでしょうか?

大和魂はどこへ行った。



あっ,議員の人たちのスタンディング・オベーションは,よくスタジアムでやっているウェーブのようなものですよ。あれは,配られて手元にある原稿を見ながら,予定調和の一種のパフォーマンスに過ぎませんから。